Grove Road Housing Scheme

Sutton-in-Ashfield

Scroll pointer image

Explore the timeline

1968X

Vic Finkelstein came to the UK as a refugee in 1968 after anti-apartheid activism in South Africa. He joined and became a leading light in the nascent disability movement in the UK.

1968

1972X

Paul Hunt writes to the Guardian on 20th September 1972 to complain that disabled people are ‘isolated in unsuitable institutions’ where their ‘views are ignored and they are subject to authoritarian and often cruel regimes’.  He says he is planning a ‘consumer group’ to give disabled people a voice.

1972

1972X

The Union of the Physically Impaired Against Segregation (UPIAS) was founded by Paul Hunt in 1972 who was at that time was a resident in a Leonard Cheshire home.  Other key members were Vic Finkelstein and Ken and Maggie Davis.

1972

1976X

In 1972, Maggie and Ken Davis establish a cooperative to buy land, commission architects and design their own housing scheme. Four years later, on 13th September 1976, Ken and Maggie moved into their own home, which they had designed specifically to enable them to have independence.

Woman in wheelchair in 70s kitchen

Discover more

1976

1995X

The Disability Discrimination Act is passed in 1995, the culmination of much of the activism which took place in the 1970s. The Act ended state and business discrimination against disabled people. It has since been superseded by the 2010 Equality Act.

1995

2018X

We are currently working with the V&A London and RIBA to catalogue and safeguard Maggie’s wonderful archive material. We are planning an exhibition at the V&A later in 2018 to explore the ways deaf and disabled people have influenced building design. Ken and Maggie’s story will form a key part of this exhibition.

2018

Grove Road housing scheme was a groundbreaking development, opened in 1976 in Sutton-in-Ashfield, which allowed disabled people to live in society and not in an institution.

When I first became disabled in the mid-1960s, the only prospects for people who needed help with their personal care were to be looked after by their families, to marry their nurse, or to end up in residential care.

– Baroness Wilkins,  speaking at the House of Lords in 2006

It was the brainchild of disabled activists Ken and Maggie Davies. It contains  six  flats, three of which are wheelchair accessible.  The creation of Grove Road marked the beginning of the Independent Living Movement.

The History of Place project will be assessing the Grove Road archive, arranging a suitable long term repository and recording the oral history of Maggie Davies.

The timeline

1968

Vic Finkelstein came to the UK as a refugee in 1968 after anti-apartheid activism in South Africa. He joined and became a leading light in the nascent disability movement in the UK.

1972

Paul Hunt writes to the Guardian on 20th September 1972 to complain that disabled people are ‘isolated in unsuitable institutions’ where their ‘views are ignored and they are subject to authoritarian and often cruel regimes’.  He says he is planning a ‘consumer group’ to give disabled people a voice.

1972

The Union of the Physically Impaired Against Segregation (UPIAS) was founded by Paul Hunt in 1972 who was at that time was a resident in a Leonard Cheshire home.  Other key members were Vic Finkelstein and Ken and Maggie Davis.

1976

Woman in wheelchair in 70s kitchen

In 1972, Maggie and Ken Davis establish a cooperative to buy land, commission architects and design their own housing scheme. Four years later, on 13th September 1976, Ken and Maggie moved into their own home, which they had designed specifically to enable them to have independence.

1995

The Disability Discrimination Act is passed in 1995, the culmination of much of the activism which took place in the 1970s. The Act ended state and business discrimination against disabled people. It has since been superseded by the 2010 Equality Act.

2018

We are currently working with the V&A London and RIBA to catalogue and safeguard Maggie’s wonderful archive material. We are planning an exhibition at the V&A later in 2018 to explore the ways deaf and disabled people have influenced building design. Ken and Maggie’s story will form a key part of this exhibition.